Tennis Ball Bounce

Sixth Grade Math

Created by:  Katie Annis 

Email:  kannis@nwr1.k12.mo.us

 

 

Introduction

Imagine that you could win a full day off of school, no teachers, homework, or textbooks, and all you have to do is win a school wide competition by using your mathematical skills!  Would you be interested?  Who wouldn't be! 

Ask these questions to yourself.  What is a linear function?  How can I determine the bounce of a tennis ball?  Can I create a line graph using Excel?   Can I compose a paragraph using Word?  Well, you are about to complete all of these tasks through a WebQuest.


 

 

Task

In order to win the competition, you and a partner will have to determine how high a tennis ball will have to be dropped in order to bounce into a 10in. tall trash bin.  You will be doing some research on linear functions and use that information to relay the data you find when determining the bounce of a tennis ball dropped at various heights.  You will also write a summary using appropriate mathematical vocabulary and present your findings.


  

 

Process  

In order to research and display the information necessary to win the competition, you will be working in teams of two that will be approved by your teacher.  Each team will then decide who will take on Role 1 and Role 2 of the process.

Step 1-   Read through all steps carefully and determine who will take on Role 1 and Role 2.

Step 2-   Look through the following links with your partner.  Discuss what a function is.

http://id.mind.net/~zona/mmts/functionInstitute/definitionOfFunction/definitionOfFunction.html   

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/FunctionMachine/  

Step 3- Click on the links below.  Explore the interactive tool and decide what makes a function linear.  Use what you've learned about functions and linear functions to come up with a definition of a linear function in your own words. 

http://www.mathopenref.com/linearexplorer.html

http://www.ies.co.jp/math/java/geo/linfg/linfg.html

Step 4-   The Experiment.  Your team will conduct an experiment using a yardstick, tennis ball, paper, and pencil. 

Role 1 -  You will be in charge of setting up the T-Chart and logging the data you collect.  The X values will be the predetermined drop measurements (0in., 3in., 6in., 9in.,...36in.)  You will also have to help your partner determine the Y values, which are the bounce measurements. 



Role 2 -  Your job is to gather and return the items needed for the experiment and conduct it.  You are also responsible for finding the Y values.

Step 5-   Once you and your partner have completed the experiment and all of your data is in a T-Chart, you can create a line graph with your information in Excel.  (You may click on the link below for directions if you need them.) Remember to print your finished line graph.

http://www.internet4classrooms.com/excel_create_chart.htm  

Step 6-   Gather all of your paperwork and discuss the results with your partner.  Did you figure out the height that you would have to drop a tennis ball in order for it to bounce at least 10in.?  Now, figure out what the rule is for the domain (X values), the rule for the range (Y values), and the equation for the function.  Be sure to include all of this information, along with your definition of a linear function and the height at which you would have to drop the tennis ball in order for it to bounce at least 10in., in your summary using Word and print it.

Step 7-   Turn in your Excel and Word printouts stapled with your names on them. 

Step 8-   Sign up with your teacher for a time to present your findings.  If you have time, you may play The Function Machine at the the following link...

http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_191_g_3_t_1.html


   

 

Evaluation  

Below defines how your project will be graded.  Please read all criteria carefully.

 

 Criteria

Advanced 

4

 Proficient

3

Basic 

 Below Basic 

1

 Score

Definition of Linear Function

Definition of a linear function is correct and is student's own words.

Definition of linear function is correct, but may not be is student's own words.

Definition of linear function is not clear.

Definition of linear function is not in student's own words.

 

Activity data in T-Chart

All data is in a T-Chart and the chart is labeled with both X and Y.

All data is in a T-Chart, but the chart is not labeled.

Some data is missing from the T-Chart.

T-Chart is missing data and is not labeled.

 

T-Chart and Line Graph using Excel

Both the T-Chart and a Line Graph appear in a printout using Excel.  All data is visible and correct and both the T-Chart and line Graph are labeled and have titles.

Both the T-Chart and a Line Graph appear in a printout using Excel.  All data is visible and correct, but the T-Chart and/or the Line Graph are missing labels or titles.

Both the T-Chart and a Line Graph appear in a printout using Excel.  Some data is missing or is incorrect, and the T-Chart and/or the Line Graph are missing labels or titles.

The Excel printout is missing either the T-Chart or Line Graph.  Some data is missing or incorrect.  The T-Chart and/or the Line Graph may be missing labels or titles.

 

Written summary of results

The written summary of results contains the rules for both the domain (X values) and the range (Y values), an equation to represent the function, uses appropriate mathematical vocabulary, and uses the six traits of writing.

The written summary of results contains the rules for both the domain (X values) and the range (Y values), an equation to represent the function, uses some appropriate mathematical vocabulary, but is not very well written.

The written summary of results contains the rules for both the domain (X values) and the range (Y values), but the equation to represent the function is incorrect and/or summary is not written well using incorrect mathematical vocabulary.

The written summary of results does not contain both rules, or the equation, and is not written well using incorrect mathematical vocabulary.

 


  

 

Conclusion  

Congratulations!  Through extensive research, you and your partner have successfully determined the height that you would have to drop a tennis ball in order for it to bounce into a 10in. tall waste bin.  Your mathematical skills have came through for you once again!  Now that you are finished, you may practice graphing ordered pairs at the following links...

http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/WebLessons/GridGraph/default.htm

http://www.aimsedu.org/aimskids/ipuzzles/hurkle/index.html




 

 

Teacher Page

Missouri State Standards-  MA 2, 3, 4  CA 1, 4, 5, 6 

1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8, 2.1, 2.7

D1A, G2A, R3D, W2E

http://dese.mo.gov/standards/

 

NETS*S Standards -  1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2d, 3b, 3d, 4b, 4c, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d 

http://www.iste.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=NETS

 

Extension Activities- Students can learn about the vertical line test for identifying functions at...

http://www.mathwords.com/v/vertical_line_test.htm


http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/VerticalLineTest/